Have Book, Will Read #2

It’s been a while since the last reading log, and it’s an icky, sticky, wet and wild sort of day outside, so naturally my mind turns to tea and books. While I can’t really justify curling up to read (I have a translation to work on, deadline looming!), I can certainly spare a moment to at least think about reading. Which is very nearly almost the next best thing. Soooo…

Recent Reads: Odd places and alternate settings. And no magic, for once, or does prophecy count?

First up was Susan Boulton’s debut Oracle, a gaslight fantasy novel. Now, I hadn’t read any gaslight before, so this was an interesting ride. I was immediately smitten by Susan’s prose and her character Claire/Oracle. As Oracle, the character blurts out seemingly random snippets of prophecy at deliciously inappropriate moments, and as Claire she struggles to reclaim her past and come to grips with her two sides.

Oracle centers around prophecy, but not the well-ordered prophecy we often see in fantasy. Instead, the messages are disjointed, confusing, often appearing absolutely useless and bizarre. I found myself thinking, over and over, this is what prophecy should look like. Something strange and alien that makes no immediate sense, not even to the one who spouts it.

The plot had lots of twists and turns and a really neat setting. I’ll certainly be keeping an eye open for future novels by the author.

Another great book I read recently was Elizabeth Fama’s Plus One. I was already acquainted with Elizabeth’s work through her nicely spooky mermaid story Monstrous Beauty, so I was looking forward to reading this one. I’m just sorry it took me so long to get around to it!

Plus One is set within an alternate history where, after the Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918, the USA was divided between night dwellers (called Smudges) and day dwellers (Rays). The setting is fabulous, and this fast-paced thriller is also a beautiful love story.

Main character Soleil Le Coeur is feisty and driven, and the flashbacks woven into the plot do a great job of coloring in her character. It was a quick read (mostly because I couldn’t put it down!) and it’s a pretty accessible YA novel; my preteen is currently devouring it, entranced.

If you want a taste of the worldbuilding, you can read the prequel short story Noma Girl on Tor.com.

Now Reading: I finally got around to Brian Staveley’s The Providence of Fire, which I mentioned in my last book log. Life and all that jazz means that lately my reading has been patchy at best, and all mixed up and back to front. However, I’m really glad that I’m finally reading the sequel to The Emperor’s Blades.

So far, so good; Brian does a great job of easing readers back into his world and reintroducing characters and settings without spelling things out too much. I really like the direction that Adare’s arc is taking her, and I’d missed reading about Valyn’s Kettral wing (there is nothing more awesome than giant battle birds!), although I think Kaden is still my favorite character. Still waters.

I think the beauty of Brian’s work lies in his characters. Yes, his worldbuilding is lovely and highly detailed. But it’s through the three very different siblings – different in personality as well as made different by the hands life has dealt them – that he leads us along the crisscrossing paths of his plot. And this threefold story strand works very nicely indeed.

To Read: Too many words, not enough hours of the day…

My current book pile is getting a little ridiculous. I’m not even talking about the to-read list I keep on my phone. I’m talking about actual physical books sitting on my coffee table. Or in my kindle.

First on the list is Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice, which I’ve heard so much about. Ann gets first dibs on the reading front because this one’s a library book so reasons.

(An aside: much as I’d love to support every single author out there by buying their books, I just can’t afford to. I do buy a lot, more than I should, really. But I’m lucky to have a great library system I can dip into at the same time.)

Anyway, once I’m done with that, next on my list is Peter V. Brett’s The Skull Throne. I read all of his Demon Cycle books pretty much as soon as they came out, so I almost can’t believe I haven’t so much as peeked in this one yet! But that’s okay; I shall continue to savor the anticipation as I stare at the great cover with Renna on it. I like Renna, and I’m so glad she gets a little more of the spotlight this time.

Third on my list (told you it was a pile!) is Max Gladstone’s Three Parts Dead, which I picked up at Boskone in February and haven’t had a chance to even open yet. His world sounds really interesting and this looks like one I’m going to enjoy.

Last up (and cheating, really, because it’s a three-fer) is Veronica Roth‘s Divergent trilogy. My daughter (the same ten-year-old who’s reading Plus One) read the novels and loved them so much she wants to share them with me. Which is pretty darn cool. So I promised her I’d read them so we can talk about the books. Kind of like a mother-daughter book club.

My kid rocks.

Abendau’s Heir

Anyone who knows me, knows that lately I’ve been enthusing all over Twitter, Facebook and the Chrons (and yes, this blog too) about Jo Zebedee’s debut space opera Abendau’s Heir, Book 1 of the Inheritance Trilogy.

I’m always happy to support my fellow writers, especially those who are just starting out, but this one is special. Not just because it’s a very good book (which it is) but because I was lucky enough to have been one of Jo’s beta readers, way in the back and beyond when I was still learning what beta readers were supposed to do (and making quite a hash of it, most likely).

So when I picked up my digital copy of Abendau (physical copy should be landing in Northern Ireland today for Jo to sign!) I was understandably awestruck. This is the second published book I’ve had the chance to beta read (the first was Emma Jane’s beautifully spooky romance Shuttered), and since I already knew the basics of the story, what an experience to be able to sit back and enjoy the storytelling itself, marveling at the polished product.

From Amazon: Kare’s seen planets destroyed by the relentless expansion of his mother’s empire. Children killed. His own family murdered. With her power to manipulate minds she may be invincible. 

Only he has the power to stop her. Kare must either face the horrifying future his father foretold for him, or allow the sacrifice of millions of people to his mother’s ambition. But in opposing her, he risks everything: his friends, his loved ones… even his sanity.

Sounds dark? Well, yes it is rather. But needfully dark, not dark for the sake of shock-value bleakness. Because sometimes stories need to tread down the shadowed paths and lead us into horrible places and terrible consequences.

In Abendau’s Heir, Jo addresses something a lot of us have probably often wondered about: the chosen one trope and what it actually means to be that chosen one. I mean, really? How many of us would actually want that burden thrust upon us, and if we did, how would we deal with it?

She talks about that in this rather nice interview on Nathan Hystad‘s blog, and again on SFF World.

Abendau’s Heir is a story that covers a lot of time; it starts with the tale of Ealyn Varnon and then switches to his son Kare, spanning some twenty-odd years in the process. We have glimpses of a young Kare, on the run from the Empress with his father and twin sister, then later a teenage Kare who we then get to watch grow up. Yet all this jumping around in time doesn’t feel awkward, it flows smoothly from one scene to the next and helps us understand how Kare becomes the man he is, and why he makes the choices that he does.

I don’t read a lot of SF, being more of a fantasy girl myself. But although Abendau’s Heir is set in a vast, beautifully developed space scenario, this isn’t really about space, or space battles, or planetary landings. It’s about people: shy, frightened, happy, sad, troubled, awkward and just plain nasty people. And Jo does this very well indeed.

I’m looking forward to Book 2, which I haven’t read so it will be a pleasant surprise (and if anyone tries to spoiler it I shall stick my fingers in my ears and sing la-la-la-la-la). But more than that; with Abendau’s Heir, Jo has shown herself to be a star on the rise. I know she has a myriad of different projects underway, and I’ll be watching excitedly to see what she comes up with next.

abendau

Have Book, Will Read #1

So, this is something new I thought I’d try out. A reading log! I’ll try to do sporadically regular (is that a thing? Can it be a thing? Please?) versions, depending on how many books I’ve eaten for breakfast each month.

Recent Reads: Lately life has been all about Vikings and the Vikingesque. But that’s all good and fine because I do loves me some decent weaponry action.

First up was Blood Will Follow, Book 2 in Snorri Kristjánsson‘s Valhalla Saga. It was great to dive back into the world of the Norse gods and meet up again with Ulfar and Audun, the Riggs and Murtaugh of the North. In this sequel to Swords of Good Men (such awesome titles!) Kristjánsson gives us a deeper look at the threads entangling his blood-drenched heroes and the puppet-masters who would shape their destiny.

Next, another sequel, Half the World. This is Book 2 in Joe Abercrombie‘s Shattered Sea trilogy, told this time from the perspective of warrior-girl Thorn and her former training partner and now oar-mate Brand. We still get to keep Yarvi, but this time we see him through other’s eyes, an interesting plot device as it puts readers in a position where they know more than the main characters. Thorn and Brand are fantastic creations and a great addition to the tale.

Now Reading: Magic, math and demons, oh my!

I recently discovered the delights of Charles Stross‘s Laundry Files, and am now devouring the second in the series (another book 2; sensing a theme here!). So far, The Jennifer Morgue is a fast-paced and fun read. Good stuff.

To Read: A little bit of this, a little bit of that.

First up, and burning a hole in my Kindle, is Book 2 (heh, what do you know? Another second…) in Brian Staveley‘s Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne trilogy, The Providence of Fire. I thoroughly enjoyed his first novel, The Emperor’s Blades, so I’m looking forward to this one.

Also on my list is Jo Zebedee‘s debut, the first in her space opera Inheritance Trilogy, Abendau’s Heir. Abendau’s release isn’t due until the very end of the month, but I’m very excited for this one as I was lucky enough to be an enthusiastic (if not very competent) beta reader for Jo. I know Abendau has been through a lot of edits since then, so I’m curious to see what the final result is. Bring on those sexy space pilots! (And, er, all the suffering and devastation too, of course.)

When Reason Breaks

Yesterday was the book birthday of my writing buddy Cindy Rodriguez. When Reason Breaks is a beautifully written contemporary YA about teenage depression.

Cindy’s done a lovely job of entwining the subject with the work and life of poet Emily Dickinson, and it’s an eye-opening read (for me, at least) on how quiet depression can be. As a mum to two preteens, it was kind of scary.

Anyhow, Cindy wrote a very sweet blog piece on the publishing process, from writing the MS, to getting signed on by her agent, all the way through to seeing it on the shelves of the bookstore for the first time.

Check it out! And then go buy the book. Also, buy kleenex. Lots and lots of kleenex.

When Reason Breaks