Night Blade: cover and sneak peek

I’m so excited to finally share the cover for NIGHT BLADE, book 2 in the Blade Hunt Chronicles! This lovely bit of prettiness was designed by the talented Tom Edwards. Check out the cover below, as well as the book blurb and a sneak peek from chapter 1…

I have more goodies up my sleeve to share with you soon: adorable character art by Corinna Marie for a few character intros I’ll be doing on the blog in the upcoming weeks. You can find the ones Corinna made for HEART BLADE here.

NIGHT BLADE will be soon be up on Goodreads and Amazon – keep an eye on my social media for updates.

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The vampire smiled at Raze. “How do you feel about a little undercover work?”

“Undercover work? What kind?”

“The dangerous kind. The sort of work that should suit Raze perfectly, since you’re so determined to leave Rose behind,” he said. “A challenge. You’re infiltrating a heist. I think you’ll make an excellent cat burglar.”

In the aftermath of the Heart Blade’s return, Del and Rose have different roads to follow. One leads forward, the other to the distant past. Rose is on a mission to infiltrate and double-cross the ultimate heist, and retrieve a game-changing prize. Meanwhile, as the Court of the Covenant prepares to meet, Del has a quest of her own. She must untangle her lost identity or risk her entire future.

With the Blade Hunt prophecy in motion, darkness threatens to rise, and a new sword emerges from the shadows.

Embrace the night.

          The motorbike raced along the deserted road, the engine a defiant roar in the dark. Bleak empty fields whipped past, the bright sparkle of Christmas lights left behind along with the last of suburban Toronto.

Raze tucked her cold face closer to the leather-clad back that rubbed against her cheek, tightening her arms around the lean waist as she screwed her eyes shut. The wind and the wild sang in her veins, tempting her, whispering. Let go, they said, join us. She smiled to herself — a grin that was all teeth and fierce pleasure — and ran her tongue over her chapped bottom lip.

She tapped his shoulder as they drew near, and the bike slowed and pulled to a stop underneath a towering elm tree, bare branches stark against the cloudy night sky. Raze climbed down, boots crunching on fresh snow. The driver killed the engine and pulled off his helmet, watching her as she tugged off her black woolen hat and ran her fingers through tangled curls. His name was Dave, or Steve, or something. She hadn’t really paid attention.

“So,” he said, “this is where you go to school?”

“Yeah, pretty much.”

He was cute, dark-eyed and dangerous-looking. She moved closer, right in his face. He had a small scar on his chin. She ran a gloved thumb over it, and then leaned in and kissed him, hard and fast. Then she drew back, already turning away as she jammed her hat back on her head.

“Raze, you going to give me your number?”

She gave him a wicked smile over her shoulder. “Oh, I don’t think so.” Then she was gone, running through the ankle-deep snow to leap at the high wall, fingers and toes finding purchase where most people would see nothing but sheer stone. She climbed higher and higher, until she threw a leg over the top and sat there, watching the boy on the bike speed away.

Raze moved her other leg over and dropped. For one instant she drank in the thrill of falling. Then she shifted, clothes and skin and shoes and self turning to fur and packed muscle. She landed lightly and scented the night, the wolf’s senses coloring in everything that her human portion was blind to. And then she smelled him and froze.

“Raze? Is that what you’re calling yourself these days?” The vampire stepped out of the trees, his aura a faint red glow in the dark. She knew her own blue werewolf aura would be clinging to her fur like a cloud. She shook herself and shifted back, body prickling with cold from the sudden change in skin temperature.

“Alex,” she replied, aiming for casual. “I was just out for a run.”

 

NIGHT BLADE, BLADE HUNT CHRONICLES #2, OUT NOVEMBER 2017.

 

Book Cover Sunday: Back Cover Blurbs

*This blog post is a follow-up to Book Cover Sunday: Fantasy Cover Art and Book Cover Sunday: SFF Book Spines.*

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines a blurb as, “a short publicity notice, as on a book jacket.” Wikipedia tells us that the term ‘blurb’ dates from the very early 1900s, and refers to “a short promotional piece accompanying a creative work.” Wikipedia goes on to say that a blurb can be written by the author or publisher, or it may quote praise received from others.

Now, I have to say, when I first had the idea for this blog post, I was a bit confused about the whole blurb thing. Writers get invited to ‘blurb’ other writers’ books. (I myself wrote one for Suzanne Jackson’s The Beguiler.) But you also see writers talking about how hard they’ve been working on their book blurbs, meaning the short summary that often goes on the back cover. So which one, exactly is this mysterious blurb?

After a bit of enthusiastic Googling, I realized the answer is, of course, both. So what can make up a back cover blurb? All or a fraction of the following:

  • Synopsis – a short summary or teaser for the story, usually one or two paragraphs, giving potential readers an idea of what the book is about, aiming at ‘hooking’ them. In some cases, authors and publishers opt to use a short scene from the book, instead.
  • Tag line – not all books and series use these, and often they’re on the front cover. But every now and then they migrate to the back of the book.
  • Endorsements – quotes from market sources such as reviewers, or other writers, praising the book.
  • Author bio and/or photo – short and sweet (unless it’s non-fiction, but I’m sticking to fiction here…)
  • Author/publisher website address.
  • Cover artist/designer credits.
  • Other books in series/other books by the author – info and/or photos.

In the name of research, I went on a (well-behaved, church-mouse-silent) rampage around my local Barnes & Noble, looking at some of the new releases for examples of back cover blurbs. I actually found quite a variety, although the most common choice seems to be a combination of synopsis and endorsements.

Let’s start with middle grade fiction. Here’s bestseller Rick Riordan’s latest novel, The Hidden Oracle, which basically has nothing on the back but a few select bits of praise. Riordan is such a huge name in kid lit that he really needs no introduction or pitch, and his work sells on name alone by now. Compare it to my own battered copy of The Lightning Thief, his first ever children’s book. It’s the paperback, so it had already been out long enough to garner some decent praise, but it uses the standard set up of synopsis plus endorsements.

Moving into YA fantasy. First off, here’s Cinda Williams Chima’s first Seven Realms book, The Demon King. As you can see, it has a pretty extensive synopsis on the back, with only a couple of endorsements. Her most recent book in the same universe, Shadowcaster, goes for more of a teaser than an actual summary, and dedicates a much larger portion of the space to endorsements.

The latest book by heavyweight Sarah J. Maas, Court of Wings and Ruin, is actually pretty different from most of the others I looked at. It has an extensive synopsis on the back, and that’s it. She’s a big name in YA fantasy, though, and the line ‘#1 New York Times Best Seller’ on the front cover is probably the only endorsement she needs.

Another big hitter’s recent release, Lord of Shadows by Cassandra Clare, also makes an interesting choice. Here, the publishers have opted for nothing except a list of other works by the author. Possibly to find new readers for past works?

Moving into adult fiction, well-loved and established author Robin Hobb has nothing but an elegant collection of endorsements on the back of her newest novel, Assassin’s Fate. But then, when you start off your back cover blurb with a quote from George R.R. Martin, you don’t really need much more!

It was interesting comparing the first and second book in John Gwynne’s series, Malice and Valor (unfortunately, the bookstore didn’t have the subsequent titles for comparison). While most of Malice is taken up by a synopsis, the sequel devotes its real estate to praise for the first book, as well as a photo of its cover. Writer and editor Christy Yaros points out that part of the reason for this approach is to make sure that new readers understand this is a second book in a series, which is a really good point.

Another ‘before and after’ comparison: Mark Lawrence’s Red Sister, first in a new trilogy, devotes its back copy to praise for the author’s first two series. This plays a double role; it shows endorsement of Lawrence’s work, and also points new readers to his previous two trilogies. A clever example of making your back cover blurb work at multiple levels. Now, if you take a look at the paperback of Lawrence’s first published novel, Prince of Thorns, you’ll notice it dedicates a fair bit of cover space to a synopsis of the story. Back then, Lawrence was still a new name in the game. Now, he has a devoted following.

The next one I’m including for creative use of space. Julia Knight’s Swords and Scoundrels manages to include back cover copy, a cool little hook paragraph that makes it clear it’s the first in a trilogy, an endorsement, character art, and the covers for the three books in the series. And yet, even with all of this, it isn’t cluttered – in fact, it looks rather sleek, and as appealing as the front cover.

It was interesting seeing the difference between the back cover of a multi-published author’s first book, when they were still a new name, and their most recent one. That made me wonder, what do the truly huge names do? I dragged myself away from the SF/F shelves of the bookstore, and went in search of the latest bestsellers by some of the publishing industry’s giants. So, what’s on the back of work by Danielle Steel, James Patterson, and Clive Cussler?

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Voilá. Now that’s a back cover blub… 😉

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