Swords and Swans

Book news! Well, anthology news, actually. Tomorrow my short story King Swan comes out in a brand new collection — Gorgon: Stories of Emergence (Pantheon Magazine).

From the official blurb: “Be changed. GORGON: STORIES OF EMERGENCE contains 42 transformative stories spanning all genres from both emerging and new voices alike, with all new stories by Gwendolyn Kiste, Richard Thomas, Annie Neugebauer, Eden Royce, Beth Cato, D.A. Xiaolin Spires and more, and featuring 10 illustrations by Carrion House.”

I’ve had a peek at some of the stories and they’re awesome! You can buy Gorgon on Amazon in ebook and paperback, starting tomorrow…

Also…

It’s been two years today since HEART BLADE was published! Happy bookversary to the Blade Hunt Chronicles!

Summer 2018 Updates

We’re already halfway through 2018 — where did all the months go? Seriously, someone needs to get working on that time-turner technology, and fast! So, what have I been up to this year?

Short stories! I made one of those infamous New Year’s promises to myself that I would submit a short story every month in 2018. So far, I’ve managed to (just about!) keep that promise. Of course, it doesn’t mean every submission has been accepted. But it’s been a good push to keep writing and — just as importantly — to keep sending my work out, even if it gets rejected. And taking a chance also means the occasional success!

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In February, my sci-fi detective tale Blood Makes Noise came out in The Last City anthology (DUST, 2018). This was a really fun initiative, with a shared-world premise that led to plenty of pre-publication discussion in our collaborator Facebook group. Check out our joint author interview in SFF World.

My angel love story Dawn Chorus was published in Kraxon Magazine in March, another happy moment. Kraxon always has great stories (free, go take a peek!) and I have a soft spot for the magazine, as it gave me my first ever paid writing sale, back in 2015. I also just handed in my contribution for an upcoming all-female-writers’ science fiction anthology: a teen time travel romance set in 1985. And I had a short story accepted for another anthology — I will have to wait for the official announcement to say more on this one, but I’m thrilled to be in it as competition was apparently pretty fierce, and the list of participating authors is amazing.

Novels! I spent most of the first part of the year finishing and revising a YA science fiction thriller. It’s completely different from my Blade Hunt Chronicles series, although my critique group says it’s still ‘very me’, which is hopefully a good thing? I’m really excited about this one! After a long querying hiatus, while I fulfilled my contracts for Heart Blade and Night Blade, I now have something brand new and have begun once again looking for an agent. Wish me luck…

And no, I haven’t forgotten my Blade Hunt readers. I’m taking a writing break in July, to visit my family in Brazil, but when I get back it’s all about books 3 and 4. Yes, the plan is to write the last two books in the series together, and hopefully have them done by the end of the year. I love my characters and story, and have promised myself (and a few of you as well) to finish the Blade Hunt Chronicles and give Del, Ash, Raze and co. the ending they deserve.

Appearances! I was once again a panelist at Boskone this February, and it definitely made a difference knowing what to expect this time around. I found that I managed to relax and enjoy my panels, and I ended up having a blast! A lot of this, of course, is due to the great moderators I had. I also took part in my local library’s Author Festival, speaking on the Teen Author panel. Out theme was Inspiration, and it was a great evening and a really good conversation.

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Photo credit Avon Free Public Library

All in all, it’s been a productive year for me so far. With plans to finish the last two Blade Hunt novels in the second semester, and to keep on writing and submitting short stories, it looks like it will get even busier once August arrives.

I’ll leave you with a link to a terrific interview I gave in January on Peat Long’s blog, with bonus Deadpool-riding-on-a-Lego-dinosaur pic. Because why not? Happy summer!

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Embrace the Night

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Blue cake to match my lovely blue cover

It’s release day for NIGHT BLADE! Happy book birthday to my second Blade Hunt Chronicles novel.

NIGHT BLADE brings familiar characters you’ve met in HEART BLADE, as well as some new faces. Rose is up and center in this book, as she attempts to infiltrate a heist and steal a certain object of interest from the very thieves she’s partnered up with. Del is learning to handle all the attention she’s getting from preternatural society, while at the same time trying to figure out her past. Ash is still dealing with all the fallout from the events in the first book, while hanging onto Del like a lifeline. And newcomer Ben just wants to keep his head down, do his job, and fade back into his self-imposed obscurity, hopefully without losing his boyfriend along the way.

I’m really excited to share this new installment of the Blade Hunt Chronicles with you all. If you haven’t read Book 1 yet, HEART BLADE will be free for Kindle from November 8-12th, so don’t miss out! NIGHT BLADE is only $2.99 right now…

Heart Blade on Amazon

Night Blade on Amazon

Add Night Blade on Goodreads

 

 

 

 

Small Press Publishing

*Based off my notes for the April 2017 Barnes & Noble panel on Publishing Your Book that I took part in, along with authors Carrie Firestone, Stephanie Robinson, and Jessica Haight*

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Publishing Your Book panel participants

 

Yesterday was #smallpressday2017. Congratulations to all those hardworking small presses out there! Keep up the good work!

What is a small press?

When you’ve been part of the writing community for a while, as I have, it’s easy to forget that many of the publishing terms that we author-type people tend to toss around can be pretty obscure to those who are unfamiliar with the industry. For instance, I get a lot of people asking me what I mean when I say I’m published by a small press. I’ve been asked several times if that’s the same as self-publishing. No, I tell them, it isn’t. Of course, self-publishing is a perfectly valid option, if approached in a professional manner. I have many writer friends who have self-published, or who are ‘hybrid’ authors (both self- and traditionally published), and who thrive within that format. But that’s not the publishing model I went with for my Blade Hunt Chronicles.

Heart Blade (and the upcoming sequel Night Blade) is published by Woodbridge Press, a small Canadian publishing house. A small press follows the same model of ‘traditional publishing’ as Penguin Random House, or Simon and Schuster, or any of the big giants. The difference is the size and scope of the company.

What can you expect from a small press? Like any large press, you can (and should) expect editorial input that contributes to a polished end product. This may be only a copyeditor, or it may include other sorts of editing. For Heart Blade, I had a developmental editor, a copy editor, and a proofreader. Other things you should expect include professional cover art, professional layout and design work, etc.

What you should NOT expect: to pay for any of this from your own pocket. Just like with a large publishing house, in the traditional model the money flows TO the author, not FROM the author. If you’re paying for any of it, you’re looking at some form of vanity press, or one of the many companies that facilitate things for self-published authors. Again, that can be a valid choice, as long as you make it with your eyes open and know exactly what you’re getting into.

Downside to small press

Your main downside is going to be reach. A small press will have a much smaller marketing budget than a larger company, and visibility will be limited. Your book deal probably won’t appear in Publisher’s Weekly, your ARCs (advanced reader copies) probably won’t reach any of the big reviewers, and your book itself may not even be in physical bookstores.

Another downside is impermanence. Of course a large press can also go under (and when they do it can be spectacularly catastrophic!), but a small press is far more likely to go bankrupt, or just quit the business. Make sure you get decent reversal of rights clauses in your contract in case this happens to you.

Upside to small press

You don’t need to have an agent (query letter phobics, take note!). Most small presses take direct submissions from writers. Some have specific submission windows, some take all-year-round subs, but they rarely deal with agents, because for an agent there’s not much point in a book deal that’s going to be worth either a tiny advance or no advance at all.

A small press is more willing to take risks on subject matter. With Heart Blade, for instance, I had two agents tell me that no publishers were interested in demons, angels, and vampires; that this sort of thing was all over and done with. But a small press such as Woodbridge can take a chance on something they like. UK press Kristell Ink is a good example: they’ve been publishing some really innovative fantasy work that might not have stood a chance in one of the bigger publishing houses. And Tickety Boo Press have invested heavily in space operas and science fiction (among other genres).

The ‘risk factor’ is especially important if you write something niche. For instance, Aqueduct Press specializes in feminist literature in all genres. Headmistress Press is even more niche: they only publish lesbian poetry. If you think your manuscript may be hard to pitch, perhaps a small press is for you. Do your research – there are many good small publishing houses out there.

Another advantage of a small press is it’s a lot more agile and fluid than a large press. If you get a publishing deal with a large press, it can take anything from 18 months to 3 years before your book comes out. A small press can go from signing to publication in a matter of months. So if you’ve written something time sensitive – maybe about a recent or upcoming world event – a small press can be a good fit for you.

Small press caution!

Study all your options. Look into the different publishing formats and models out there. If you decide that a small press may be the ideal home for your manuscript, then put all those researching skills to good use. There are plenty of less-than-savory companies out there, and that’s where resources such as the SFWA’s ‘Writer Beware’ page, or the Water Cooler at Absolute Write, can be invaluable in helping you avoid the scammers and find a good, legitimate fit for your work.

Also, dip a toe into the small press waters by reading a few authors who have chosen this publishing model. Get a feel for different companies by investing in the work they publish. At the very least, you may discover some hidden gems (check out the #smallpressbigstories hashtag on Twitter for inspiration). If you find a writer you like, help spread the word (and stretch the tiny marketing budget) by sharing your discovery. All of us small press authors thank you!

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Journeys Anthology

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I’m thrilled to have a short story in a brand new anthology by Woodbridge Press, to be released on February 15th. Fourteen fantasy road tales by a fabulous list of authors. And a stabby little story by yours truly, called ‘Fool’s Quest’. The collection has been edited by Teresa Edgerton, and should be a truly drool-worthy addition to any fantasy fan’s bookshelf.

Stories byJohn Gwynne, Gail Z. Martin, Julia Knight, Jacob Cooper, Steven Poore, Dan Jones, Anna Dickinson, Adrian Tchaikovsky, Juliet E. McKenna, Juliana Spink Mills, Samanda R. Primeau, Davis Ashura, Charlie Pulsipher, and Thaddeus White.

E-book pre-orders are already up, with a special 99c/99p promo price. Paperback coming soon!

Amazon US/ Amazon UK

Add to Goodreads

 

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Gorgeous cover art by Tom Edwards

 

Aliens – The Truth Is Coming

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I have a short story out this week in a brand new anthology by Tickety Boo Press, UK. Aliens – The Truth Is Coming has a great line up of authors, with a wide variety of takes on the theme.

From the publisher:

Many of us look up into the wondrous night sky and know that we are looking at a galaxy full of life. It doesn’t matter that we haven’t discovered definitive proof of it yet – we know it’s out there and, perhaps, looking back at us, wondering the same thing in return.

The stories in this anthology explore myriad ideas of what ‘extra-terrestrial’ could mean. Not only to humanity, but to individuals. 

You will read stories of invasion, stories of loss and discovery, stories of trickery and subjugation, and so much more.
This anthology throws the doors wide open, and all you need do is step through… 

And here are the authors:

Foreword and Acknowledgements by Andrew Angel

Stories:

In Plain Sight by Juliana Spink Mills

Geometry by Alex Davis

Gods of the Ice Planet by Adrian Tchaikovsky

Island Visit by Nathan Hystad

Even the Klin Are Only Human by Bryn Fortey

A New Dawn by Liz Gruder

Rent by Steven Poore

Salvage by MJ Kobernus

The Devil’s Rock by William Anderson

The Man Who Wasn’t Dead by Terry Grimwood

We Three Remain by Stewart Hotston

Welcome to Cosmic Journey by Michael Chandos

The Zoo of Dark Creatures by Leslie J Anderson

Here by Tim James

 

You can find the anthology on Amazon UK and Amazon US.

Book Cover Sunday: Fantasy Cover Art

I was browsing my to-read pile and ended up going for the new Kristell Ink anthology Fight Like a Girl, in part for the glorious cover. That got me thinking about cover art. Now, I’m not hugely influenced by book covers. I tend to go by synopsis and sample pages rather than looks. But I can’t deny that when a book sounds interesting AND has a gorgeous cover, it’s a huge bonus. I’ll pick up my favorites again and again, just to feast my eyes on the artwork and maybe reread a page or two.

I began pulling out books from my shelves that really appealed to me for one reason or another. Looking through the pile on my table, I realized that the covers seemed to fall into four distinct camps. Now, I’m no expert on cover art, or art at all for that matter. So feel free to disagree in the comments and add your own categories!

Category 1: The ‘teaser trailer’ cover.

This type of cover is big in children’s fiction, and indeed my first ever cover love was C.S. Lewis’ Narnia series, beautifully illustrated by Pauline Baynes (1970’s edition). The artwork gives us a sneak peek at the story, showing us a scene or a setting, and providing a taste of things to come.

Examples for this category include the John Rocco covers for Rick Riordan’s books. Rocco created all the US covers for Riordan’s middle grade and YA work, and in my opinion pulls off the ‘teaser trailer’ aspect very well, giving us enough of a hint at what will happen to get us interested.

Of course, these are covers aimed at younger readers. However, the Michael Whelan art for Brandon Sanderson’s Stormlight Archive does much the same for an older target audience. Look at the cover for The Way of Kings, below. Can’t you just picture the soaring music of the trailer as the camera pulls out to sweep the landscape? Don’t you just want to know more, immediately?

Sometimes a ‘teaser trailer’ cover doesn’t even need human figures. The Tim Byrne cover art for the Rojan Dizon series by Francis Knight is a particularly effective example. Once again, can’t you just imagine the camera swooping in towards the streets in this cover for Knight’s Fantasy Noir novel Last to Rise?

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Category 2: The ‘character hook’ cover.

This is probably one of the most prevalent cover types in fantasy. Hooded rogues, brooding kings, towering warriors. There’s a subtype for each and every subgenre. Some can be a little cliché, others find a way to make an impression. The difference between this category and the first? While the ‘teaser trailer’ cover tries to hook us with a promise of a story, the character cover centers it all on the main protagonist(s). It wants us to immediately bond with them, anchoring our curiosity on the figure the covers portray and encouraging us to discover their story.

The cover for Swords and Scoundrels by Julia Knight is pretty typical of the category, although we have two characters in this case, and not the more usual one. Illustrated by Gene Mollica and designed by Wendy Chan, what sets a cover of this sort above others is the beautiful artwork. The characters must be appealing enough that we say, “Why yes, I will enter your domain and hear your story, dear swashbuckling people on the cover!” It’s a simple set-up, but it works.

Teresa Edgerton’s Mask and Dagger duology does something a little different. In both Goblin Moon and Hobgoblin Night, Sarah J. Swainger’s cover art opts for a dark outline, reminiscent of the silhouette portraits popular in the mid-to-late 18th century, a particularly fitting nod to Edgerton’s Victorian-inspired world. The effect is clean, crisp, but still remains within the domain of ‘character hook’ covers.

A modern take on the theme was used effectively in the US covers for Myke Cole’s new military fantasy trilogy. Illustrated by Larry Rostant and designed by Diana Kolsky, the covers for Gemini Cell and Javelin Rain pulse with energy. The enigmatic character portrayal and the vibrancy of the artwork draw us in and promises a thrilling ride.

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Category 3: The ‘one Ring to bind them’ cover.

In yet another version of the ‘teaser trailer’ cover, this category takes an inanimate object and uses it as a story hook. A mysterious symbol might promise a tale of magic. A sword, the allure of violent and heroic deeds. You get the idea. Personally, I think the ‘one Ring’ covers can be particularly effective for a series, adding a new element for each book. This form of cover art treads the line between teaser hook and my last category, the ‘graphic glory’ cover.

The Larry Rostant/David Stevenson covers for George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire are a good example. Simple, clean, and to the point, they each prominently feature one item relating to events in the book, using background color as an important tool to give each book a separate identity within the common thread. The gloriously red art for A Feast for Crows, for instance, is repeated on the spine, a clever ploy for on-shelf prettiness.

The covers for the Seven Realms series by Cinda Williams Chima go a step further. The original four books, as well as the newly released Flamecaster, first in a new series set many years later, join together ‘significant object’ with ‘teaser trailer’ backgrounds. Sneaky! And also very effective. Now that you’ve seen it, aren’t you just dying to know more about the mysterious amulet thing on the cover? And how does it fit in with the city behind? Art by Sasha Vinogradova and design by Erin Fitzsimmons.

The original UK cover for Joe Abercrombie’s Best Served Cold takes the ‘one Ring’ concept and runs with it, far, and fast, and wide. We have a map! And a sword! There are coins, and blood splatters! It took a whole team to create, according to Joe’s blog. It’s pretty amazing, to tell the truth, and I really wish it were the cover of the version on my Kindle. It’s not, unfortunately, so I had to resort to online drooling. But really, there are so many different objects on this cover that it’s a whole micro-story in itself. A sort of connect-the-dots intro to the story inside.

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Category 4: The ‘graphic glory’ cover.

This category of book cover is deliciously graphic, with a lean, clean beauty of a concept. It’s less about hooking the reader with the promise of a story, and more about wowing them with stunning artwork that pretty much stands alone without the novel inside. If I were to frame and display any of the books in my personal library, it would probably be the ones with this sort of cover.

I originally bought A Darker Shade of Magic, by V.E. Schwab, in e-version. But I eventually went out and bought a physical copy, too. I wanted it on my shelf; I needed it on my shelf. Although this cover does refer to the novel, the appeal isn’t in the story hook but in the sheer prettiness of Will Staehle’s artwork.

Tom Pollock’s Skyscraper Throne trilogy is another personal favorite, both in terms of covers and content. The UK cover art by Ghost is discreet, minimalist, and lovely. Even if I had no idea what was inside The City’s Son and its sequels, I’d probably peek just because I like the cover so much.

To finish where I started, Kristell Ink’s Fight Like a Girl anthology fits neatly into the ‘graphic glory’ category. The paper doll sweetness of Sarah Anne Langton’s cover art is too cute for words, and fits the book concept admirably: after all, in an anthology each author mounts their own unique character, and has their own distinct take on the theme. And you can dive deeper, taking the idea of paper dolls and examining the roles society hands out to women. Charming and clever!

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In the name of ‘blogging’, I’ve just spent a fun couple of hours on a rainy afternoon looking through my physical and virtual shelves. How about taking a look at the books you own? Which are the cover styles that appeal to you? And why?

(See also Book Cover Sunday: SFF Book Spine)

Publishing deal for Heart Blade

Yesterday was one big, smiley, happy day from start to end. It started out with a contract for breakfast and ended with an official press release from my publisher. My book publisher. I’m over the moon that I can finally talk about Heart Blade, the first in my Blade Hunt Chronicles series, to be published by Woodbridge Press.

I finished writing Heart Blade just over a year ago, and Nathan Hystad was one of my lovely beta readers at the time. This year he launched Woodbridge Press, which just came out with a deliciously spooky horror anthology, The Haunting of Lake Manor Hotel. Woodbridge has two more anthologies planned for this year, and oh, hey, I’m in one of them (it has a fabulous line-up of authors which Nathan should be announcing soon).

When Nathan approached me and made an offer for Heart Blade, I was really excited. Yes, Woodbridge is a brand new press, but I have absolute faith in Nathan and his vision, and I’m looking forward to working with him and his team to bring the Blade Hunt world out from the dusty confines of my virtual filing cabinet and into the light of the day.

Blade Hunt is an urban fantasy series that straddles the line between YA and adult. Book 1, Heart Blade, is set right here in my home state of Connecticut, and introduces us to the Chronicles lore and some of the key players of the Court of the Covenant.

Over the next months, as all the necessary pieces of the publishing jigsaw come together – such as edits and copyedits and cover art – I’ll be sharing some of my worldbuilding extras with you all. I’ll also post fun bits and pieces over on bladehunt.tumblr.com.

But for now I’ll let my publisher do the talking.

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Abendau’s Journey: Interview with Jo Zebedee

Northern Irish science fiction and fantasy author Jo Zebedee is not only an incredible writer, but a highly motivated one too, juggling numerous projects with a busy home and work life. Jo has had several short stories accepted by magazines and anthologies (some of them upcoming throughout this year), and her 2015 self-published post-alien invasion thriller, Inish Carraig, has been doing very well indeed and is garnering some fantastic reviews. Her dark fantasy novel, Waters and the Wild, is due out in 2017 with Inspired Quill.

But the reason that I’ve asked Jo to join me here is to celebrate the launch of the second volume in her space opera The Inheritance Trilogy, Sunset Over Abendau. Abendau’s universe is a special place for Jo; it’s one she’s been dreaming about since her teenage years. The first book in the series, Abendaus Heir, was published in 2015 by Tickety Boo Press. The story of a rebellion led against an evil Empress by her own son, Kare, Abendau dives deep into questions that speculative fiction doesn’t usually bother to ask: what is it really like to be the Chosen One? What are the pressures and consequences of taking on this burden?

Abendaus Heir, despite being a fast-paced space adventure, was often dark, which was one of the things I enjoyed about it. Jo wasn’t afraid to ask those tough questions, or take a good, hard look at the things we’d often rather sweep under the mat. Torture, both mental and physical. Post-traumatic stress. And how far a person can really go before they begin to snap. Sunset Over Abendau takes us a step further, to a place ten years on in the story and the inevitable fallout from the first novel. For a deeper breakdown of what to expect, check out Jo’s own post on the subject.

Jo often blogs candidly about the writing process and the ups and downs of the publishing world (find her posts on jozebwrites.blogspot.com). So I’m going to take this opportunity to peek a little closer into nitty-gritty of getting a new book out.

Juliana: Jo, congratulations on the launch of Sunset Over Abendau! How does it feel to see yet another piece of Kare’s journey set in place?

Jo: It feels really good. To get to the next stage of all my characters’ lives was fun. Also, my third book release (I have a standalone as well) is quite a big one, I feel – when people talk about writers getting established, they often say the third book is a good sign of that being the case. Certainly I feel more confident about the processes at this stage.

Juliana: Accepting an offer for a trilogy means committing to working with the same publishing house for a long stretch of time. How did you first feel when taking this leap? How about now, with Book 2 out and Book 3 approaching fast? 

Jo: I felt confident taking the leap in many ways, and less so in others. I knew my editor would be Teresa Edgerton who I’d worked with on a developmental basis before and had a lot of trust in. So, that fear – of not being able to work with the editor for three books – was allayed.

But my publisher, Tickety Boo Press, were very new and going with any new publisher is a risk. My contract was drawn up when I was agented, however, so I was happy the clauses were in place to protect me. So far, so good – I’m happy with my covers, I get good communication and my editing has been excellent.

I think that’s important for any writer, by the way, that they do have confidence in their contract – it protects both them and the publisher and makes for a better working relationship. 

Juliana: You had a full year between the launch of the first and second in the trilogy. However the third, Abendau’s Legacy, will be out later this year. How has it been coping with the tighter editing window? 

Jo: Well, I did manage to plonk a self published book between the two Abendau’s, so the two books a year model is established. But book three needs a little more work (it is finished but the polish depended on the edit of Sunset as the two are closely linked) so that will keep me busy over the summer.

Also – I’m promoting the books now. I have a lot of writing commitments on that I didn’t have last year. But I’m still working as writing doesn’t pay a wage. Which means producing new stuff is slower, and there may be more of a gap between books in the future. If I settled into the 9 months to a year model, I’d be quite happy and I think that’s doable.

Juliana: Following on from the last question, from your experience with Tickety Boo Press what sort of editorial support should a new author expect from their publisher? 

Jo: Editorial support is really important and something I think should be discussed at the contracting stage – expectations, who it will be with and, if possible, the vision for the book. At the very least, a story-editor and copy-editor should look at the script. A proofreader would be an additional tier, but many publishers now run proofing into the copy edit.

I think the relationship is important – I have to trust my editor. If not, the book could be worsened for it (not a problem I’ve had with Abendau but I had more difficulties with Inish Carraig and some of the direction I was advised to take it – although not by its final editor.) But I also need to have enough confidence to stand over things I believe strongly in and feel I can negotiate on them (I usually lose, though.)

Juliana: How many versions of the trilogy have you written, both before and after editorial input? 

Jo: Ha! I’m renowned for this on some forums… For Abendau’s Heir I did something like 18 re-writes, mostly substantive. I once lopped 70,000 words off the start – losing most of the Ealyn point of view in the process – to reshape it.

I have improved! Sunset will have had about five writes and Legacy the same. That’s usually first draft – writing group feed back – second draft – beta feedback – third draft – editorial – fourth draft – high-end edit – fifth draft, the polish.

On the plus side I do have the makings of a nice prequel already written…. 🙂

Juliana: Could you lead us through the basic steps to publication, from acceptance of submission to holding the finished book in your hand? 

Jo: Normally the cover is in place before the edits, so that’s the first stage. I then like to have a last check over the manuscript before forwarding for editorial.

I get a first edit back, consisting of two documents: the manuscript with notes and, more importantly, a document with overview comments in it. That’s my first read through, and it usually starts my cogs whirring. Then I address the full mss.

I work from the beginning to end. I’m a quick editor and rewriter, and it usually takes me 4-6 weeks, depending on the amount to do. If I have any scenes I’m desperately struggling with, I’ll run those past my writing group.

Once finished, I send it back to my editor with the changes highlighted. I hear back a couple of weeks later and that feedback normally looks at chapters or scenes that are specifically needing work. I amend those and send back and forth until my editor is happy and I’m begging not to have to look at that scene again, and then it gets forwarded for the copy edit from Sam Primeau.

The mss comes back from copy editing with changes marked, and usually a few comments seeking clarification, all of which I review before accepting the mss. And then it’s over to my publisher for formatting and release, and out of my hands.

Of course, in here there are things like Advanced Review Copies being sent out, and cover quotes sourced. There’s more to it than it looks!

Juliana: I know a lot of writers worry about their book covers, and whether they’ll love or hate them. Did you have any sort of control over your own cover art?

Jo: I don’t have control per se – which is good as I’m not a cover designer! – but I do get input. Normally I get to put in an idea of what I’d like – with the Abendau covers that has been around the central colours recently – and get to see an early mock up. Gary from Tickety Boo does the covers and I think there is a distinct style for the trilogy with a nice space opera feel. They’ll look good on the shelf together!

Juliana: A little bird (okay, Facebook and Twitter) told me that Abendaus Heir is in process of being recorded as an audio book. Have you had any involvement in this process? What’s it like to hear your words out loud? 

Jo: I haven’t been involved, which is fine, but I have heard the opening section. I’m really looking forward to hearing the finished product – Ravenwood audio are doing a great job.

It’s odd listening to it, but enjoyable. I’m well aware my names can be hard to pronounce so am easy going about that sort of thing, and am happy to enjoy the outcome rather that critique it.

Juliana: You’ve tried different paths, traditional and self-publishing, and are doing very well on both. With more and more writers opting for the apparent ‘ease’ of self-publishing, what can traditional publishing still offer the author? 

Jo: I think this concept that self publishing is easy is misleading. To do it well is a ton of work (and I try not to put anything out under my name that is shoddy) and you’re doing that work on your own. For a book or two I think I could manage but, as more come out and I’m trying to manage promotion and offer periods etc etc, I think it would eat into my writing time too much.

For instance, today a reader contacted me to let me know the paragraph indents are missing in my self-published book. Yet they’re there in the uploaded version and on my kindle app, plus in the sample. So it’s not a formatting issue. Which means asking Amazon and all that rigmarole, and there’s an hour chasing all that when I could have been writing.

So what does Trad offer me? (And I’m continuing to make that choice) – time to write. Writing is where the income will come from. If I don’t have time to produce more, things become unviable. Plus, it’s the bit I love and want to do more of. So, for me, the lower margin/royalty is a trade-off to have the time I need to go onwards and to write the stories that are eating at me to get out.

Having said that, I’ve enjoyed the self publishing and would definitely do it again with the right product.

Juliana: Any words of advice for new authors starting out on the submission path, or perhaps contemplating their first publishing deal?

Jo: None of the journey – the rejections, the knocks – are personal. Try to be thick skinned, if you can. And enjoy it – we worry so much about every sales and reviews and acceptances and whatever it is you seek we don’t leave enough time to savour everything. 

Juliana: Jo, thank you very much for sharing Abendau’s journey to publication. I’m looking forward to reading the new book and, of course, the conclusion Abendau’s Legacy later on this year. 

You can find Abendau’s Heir and Sunset Over Abendau at the Tickety Boo Press shop and on Amazon, both US and UK. For those in Northern Ireland, the books will both be available at Easons and Blackwell’s